Dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrids enhance the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes against murine colon cancer: A comparative analysis of antigen loading methods for the vaccination of immunotherapeutic dendritic cells

  • Authors:
    • Takashi Yasuda
    • Takashi Kamigaki
    • Tetsu Nakamura
    • Tatsuya Imanishi
    • Shun Hayashi
    • Kentaro Kawasaki
    • Shiro Takase
    • Tetsuo Ajiki
    • Yoshikazu Kuroda
  • Corresponding author:
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: Friday, December 1, 2006
  • Pages: 1317-1324 DOI: 10.3892/or.16.6.1317

Abstract

Dendritic cells (DCs) have been used successfully for inducing effective anti-tumor immune responses in advanced cancer patients undergoing tumor-specific immunotherapy. Appropriate antigen pulsing is a crucial parameter for optimizing the efficacy of immunotherapy as well as anti-tumor protection therapy. Using a murine colon cancer model, we evaluated the anti-tumor efficacy of four different preparations of DC vaccines that contained either a whole tumor or its derivatives, including i) DCs pulsed with tumor lysate, ii) DCs pulsed with necrotic tumor cells, iii) DCs pulsed with apoptotic tumor cells, and iv) DC-tumor cell fusion hybrids. Our data show that DC-tumor cell fusion hybrids and DCs pulsed with irradiated apoptotic tumor cells were more potent than DCs with freeze-thawed necrotic tumor cells for the induction of protective anti-tumor responses. The vaccination of DCs pulsed with tumor lysate failed to elicit any anti-tumor effect. In animals administered with higher doses of a tumor-cell challenge, DC-tumor cell fusion hybrids elicited the most effective anti-tumor response. Among the preparations tested, mice immunized with DC-tumor cell fusion hybrids resulted in the greatest induction of cytotoxicity as measured by the cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity of both the splenocytes and the Thy1.2-positive T lymphocytes. Furthermore, the in vitro production of IFN-γ polarized to the Th1 cytokine responses was highest in the splenocytes derived from mice vaccinated with DC-tumor cell fusion hybrids. Our results suggest that DC-tumor cell fusion hybrids are more potent inducers of protection against solid tumors, such as colon cancer, than other antigen-loading strategies using whole tumor cell materials.
Journal Cover

December 2006
Volume 16 Issue 6

Print ISSN: 1021-335X
Online ISSN:1791-2431

2013 Impact Factor: 2.191
2014 I.F. (Expected) ≥ 2.527 Ranked #33/202 Oncology
(total number of cites)

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APA
Yasuda, T., Kamigaki, T., Nakamura, T., Imanishi, T., Hayashi, S., Kawasaki, K. ... Kuroda, Y. (2006). Dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrids enhance the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes against murine colon cancer: A comparative analysis of antigen loading methods for the vaccination of immunotherapeutic dendritic cells. Oncology Reports, 16, 1317-1324. http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/or.16.6.1317
MLA
Yasuda, T., Kamigaki, T., Nakamura, T., Imanishi, T., Hayashi, S., Kawasaki, K., Takase, S., Ajiki, T., Kuroda, Y."Dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrids enhance the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes against murine colon cancer: A comparative analysis of antigen loading methods for the vaccination of immunotherapeutic dendritic cells". Oncology Reports 16.6 (2006): 1317-1324.
Chicago
Yasuda, T., Kamigaki, T., Nakamura, T., Imanishi, T., Hayashi, S., Kawasaki, K., Takase, S., Ajiki, T., Kuroda, Y."Dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrids enhance the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes against murine colon cancer: A comparative analysis of antigen loading methods for the vaccination of immunotherapeutic dendritic cells". Oncology Reports 16, no. 6 (2006): 1317-1324. http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/or.16.6.1317