Preconditioning methods influence tumor property in an orthotopic bladder urothelial carcinoma rat model

  • Authors:
    • Kozo Miyazaki
    • Yuji Morimoto
    • Nobuhiro Nishiyama
    • Hiroyuki Satoh
    • Masamitsu Tanaka
    • Nariyoshi Shinomiya
    • Keiichi Ito
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: November 15, 2013     https://doi.org/10.3892/mco.2013.214
  • Pages: 65-70
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Abstract

Urothelial carcinoma (UC) is an extremely common type of cancer that occurs in the bladder. It has a particularly high rate of recurrence. Therefore, preclinical studies using animal models are essential to determine effective forms of treatment. In the present study, in order to establish an orthotopic bladder UC animal model with clinical relevance, the effects of preconditioning methods on properties of the developed tumor were evaluated. The bladder cavity was pretreated with phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS), acid‑base, trypsin (TRY) or poly (L‑lysine) (PLL) and then rat UC cells (AY‑27) (4x106 cells) were inoculated. The results demonstrated that, two weeks later, the tumorigenic rate (88%) and tumor count (2.3 per rat) were not significantly different among the preconditioning methods, whereas tumor volume and invasion depth into bladder tissue were significantly different. Average tumor volumes were >50 mm3 in the PBS and acid‑base‑treated groups and <10 mm3 in the TRY‑ and PLL‑treated groups. The percentage of invasive tumors (T2 or more advanced stage) was ~75% of total tumors in the PBS‑ and acid‑base‑treated groups, whereas the percentages were reduced in the TRY‑ and PLL‑treated groups (58 and 32%, respectively). Non‑invasive tumors (Ta or T1) accounted for 54% of tumors in the PLL‑treated group, which was 2‑5‑fold higher than the percentages in the remaining groups. Properties of the developed tumor in the rat orthotopic UC model were different depending on preconditioning methods. Therefore, different animal models suitable for a discrete preclinical examination may be established by using the appropriate preconditioning condition.

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Copy and paste a formatted citation
APA
Miyazaki, K., Morimoto, Y., Nishiyama, N., Satoh, H., Tanaka, M., Shinomiya, N., & Ito, K. (2014). Preconditioning methods influence tumor property in an orthotopic bladder urothelial carcinoma rat model. Molecular and Clinical Oncology, 2, 65-70. https://doi.org/10.3892/mco.2013.214
MLA
Miyazaki, K., Morimoto, Y., Nishiyama, N., Satoh, H., Tanaka, M., Shinomiya, N., Ito, K."Preconditioning methods influence tumor property in an orthotopic bladder urothelial carcinoma rat model". Molecular and Clinical Oncology 2.1 (2014): 65-70.
Chicago
Miyazaki, K., Morimoto, Y., Nishiyama, N., Satoh, H., Tanaka, M., Shinomiya, N., Ito, K."Preconditioning methods influence tumor property in an orthotopic bladder urothelial carcinoma rat model". Molecular and Clinical Oncology 2, no. 1 (2014): 65-70. https://doi.org/10.3892/mco.2013.214