In vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy of Drosophila melanogaster at 14.1 T shows trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to reduced insulin signaling

  • Authors:
    • Valeria Righi
    • Yiorgos Apidianakis
    • Dionyssios Mintzopoulos
    • Loukas Astrakas
    • Laurence G. Rahme
    • A. Aria Tzika
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: August 1, 2010     https://doi.org/10.3892/ijmm_00000450
  • Pages: 175-184
Metrics: Total Views: 0 (Spandidos Publications: | PMC Statistics: )
Total PDF Downloads: 0 (Spandidos Publications: | PMC Statistics: )


Abstract

In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), a non-destructive biochemical tool for investigating live organisms, has yet to be used in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a useful model organism for investigating genetics and physiology. We developed and implemented a high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS) MRS method to investigate live Drosophila at 14.1 T. We demonstrated, for the first time, the feasibility of using HRMAS MRS for molecular characterization of Drosophila with a conventional MR spectrometer equipped with an HRMAS probe. We showed that the metabolic HRMAS MRS profiles of injured, aged wild-type (wt) flies and of immune deficient (imd) flies were more similar to chico flies mutated at the chico gene in the insulin signaling pathway, which is analogous to insulin receptor substrate1-4 (IRS1-4) in mammals and less to those of adipokinetic hormone receptor (akhr) mutant flies, which have an obese phenotype. We thus provide evidence for the hypothesis that trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to insulin signaling. This link may explain the mitochondrial dysfunction that accompanies insulin resistance and muscle wasting that occurs in trauma, aging and immune system deficiencies, leading to higher susceptibility to infection. Our approach advances the development of novel in vivo non-destructive research approaches in Drosophila, suggests biomarkers for investigation of biomedical paradigms, and thus may contribute to novel therapeutic development.

Related Articles

Journal Cover

August 2010
Volume 26 Issue 2

Print ISSN: 1107-3756
Online ISSN:1791-244X

Sign up for eToc alerts

Recommend to Library

Copy and paste a formatted citation
x
APA
Righi, V., Apidianakis, Y., Mintzopoulos, D., Astrakas, L., Rahme, L.G., & Tzika, A.A. (2010). In vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy of Drosophila melanogaster at 14.1 T shows trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to reduced insulin signaling . International Journal of Molecular Medicine, 26, 175-184. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijmm_00000450
MLA
Righi, V., Apidianakis, Y., Mintzopoulos, D., Astrakas, L., Rahme, L. G., Tzika, A. A."In vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy of Drosophila melanogaster at 14.1 T shows trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to reduced insulin signaling ". International Journal of Molecular Medicine 26.2 (2010): 175-184.
Chicago
Righi, V., Apidianakis, Y., Mintzopoulos, D., Astrakas, L., Rahme, L. G., Tzika, A. A."In vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy of Drosophila melanogaster at 14.1 T shows trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to reduced insulin signaling ". International Journal of Molecular Medicine 26, no. 2 (2010): 175-184. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijmm_00000450