Open Access

Protective effects of scopolamine and penehyclidine hydrochloride on acute cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury after cardiopulmonary resuscitation and effects on cytokines

  • Authors:
    • Dengqin Wang
    • Qi Jiang
    • Xiuling Du
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: December 15, 2017     https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2017.5646
  • Pages:2027-2031
  • Copyright: © Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License.

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Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate the protective effects of scopolamine and penehyclidine hydrochloride on acute cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury after cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and the effect on cytokine levels. Eighty patients with cardiac arrest admitted to our hospital from June 2011 to December 2015 were recru­ited and randomly divided into two groups (n=40 each). Following cardiopulmonary resuscitation, scopolamine was administered in the control group, whereas penehyclidine hydrochloride was administered in the observation group. After intervention, the following medical indicators were compared between the groups: Intracranial pressure, cerebral oxygen partial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, assessment of the balance of cerebral oxygen supply and demand, levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and blood lactic acid, levels of oxidative stress markers, and levels of inflammatory‑related factors. Additionally, the areas of brain tissue edema and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores before and after intervention were compared. Rescue success rates of the groups were recorded. After intervention, the following indicators were lower in the observation group than in the control group: Intracranial pressure (p<0.05), levels of NSE (p<0.05), levels of blood lactic acid (p<0.05), levels of malondialdehyde (p<0.05), and levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1, and hs-CRP (p<0.05). However, the following indicators were higher in the observation group than in the control group: Cerebral oxygen partial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure (p<0.05), levels of CaO2, CjvO2, and CERO2 (p>0.05), and levels of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase (p<0.05). Additionally, the areas of brain tissue edema after intervention were smaller in the observation group than those before intervention and those after intervention in the control group (p<0.05). Similarly, the NIHSS scores after intervention in the observation group were lower than those before intervention and those after intervention in the control group (p<0.05). Rescue success rate was significantly higher in observation group than in control group (p<0.05). In conclusion, administration of penehyclidine following cardiopulmonary resuscitation can effectively improve cerebral perfusion pressure, lower intracranial pressure, reduce brain tissue edema and inflammation, and improve neurological function.

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February 2018
Volume 15 Issue 2

Print ISSN: 1792-0981
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APA
Wang, D., Jiang, Q., & Du, X. (2018). Protective effects of scopolamine and penehyclidine hydrochloride on acute cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury after cardiopulmonary resuscitation and effects on cytokines. Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine, 15, 2027-2031. https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2017.5646
MLA
Wang, D., Jiang, Q., Du, X."Protective effects of scopolamine and penehyclidine hydrochloride on acute cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury after cardiopulmonary resuscitation and effects on cytokines". Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine 15.2 (2018): 2027-2031.
Chicago
Wang, D., Jiang, Q., Du, X."Protective effects of scopolamine and penehyclidine hydrochloride on acute cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury after cardiopulmonary resuscitation and effects on cytokines". Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine 15, no. 2 (2018): 2027-2031. https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2017.5646