Differential expression of CXCR4 and CXCR7 with various stem cell markers in paired human primary and recurrent glioblastomas

  • Authors:
    • Charlotte Flüh
    • Kirsten Hattermann
    • H. Maximilian Mehdorn
    • Michael Synowitz
    • Janka Held-Feindt
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: January 25, 2016     https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.2016.3354
  • Pages: 1408-1416
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Abstract

The chemokine CXCL12 (also termed SDF-1, stromal cell-derived factor-1) and its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 are known to play a pivotal role in tumor progression including glioblastomas (GBM). Previous investigations focused on the expression and functional roles of CXCR4 and CXCR7 in different GBM cell subpopulations, but comparative analysis in matched primary versus recurrent GBM samples are still lacking. Thus, here we investigated the expression of CXCR4 and CXCR7 on mRNA and protein level using matched primary and recurrent GBM pairs. Additionally, as GBM CXCR4-positive stem-like cells are supposed to give rise to recurrence, we compared the expression of both receptors in primary and recurrent GBM cells expressing either neural (MUSASHI-1) or embryonic stem cell markers (KLF-4, OCT-4, SOX-2, NANOG). We were able to show that both CXCR4 and CXCR7 were expressed at considerable mRNA and protein levels. CXCR7 was downregulated in relapse cases, and different groups regarding CXCR4/CXCR7 expression differences between primary and recurrent samples could be distinguished. A co-expression of both receptors was rare. In line with this, CXCR4 was co-expressed with all investigated neural and embryonic stem cell markers in both primary and recurrent tissues, whereas CXCR7 was mostly found on stem cell marker-negative cells, but was co-expressed with KLF-4 on a distinct GBM cell subpopulation. These results point to an individual role of CXCR4 and CXCR7 in stem cell marker-positive GBM cells in glioma progression and underline the opportunity to develop new therapeutic tools for GBM intervention.

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April 2016
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Copy and paste a formatted citation
APA
Flüh, C., Hattermann, K., Mehdorn, H.M., Synowitz, M., & Held-Feindt, J. (2016). Differential expression of CXCR4 and CXCR7 with various stem cell markers in paired human primary and recurrent glioblastomas. International Journal of Oncology, 48, 1408-1416. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.2016.3354
MLA
Flüh, C., Hattermann, K., Mehdorn, H. M., Synowitz, M., Held-Feindt, J."Differential expression of CXCR4 and CXCR7 with various stem cell markers in paired human primary and recurrent glioblastomas". International Journal of Oncology 48.4 (2016): 1408-1416.
Chicago
Flüh, C., Hattermann, K., Mehdorn, H. M., Synowitz, M., Held-Feindt, J."Differential expression of CXCR4 and CXCR7 with various stem cell markers in paired human primary and recurrent glioblastomas". International Journal of Oncology 48, no. 4 (2016): 1408-1416. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.2016.3354