Vitamin E reduces hepatic fibrosis in mice with Schistosoma japonicum infection

  • Authors:
    • Xuefeng Wang
    • Rongbo Zhang
    • Jiuwei Du
    • Youying Hu
    • Lifa Xu
    • Jun Lu
    • Song Ye
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: Tuesday, November 1, 2011
  • Pages:465-468 DOI: 10.3892/mmr.2011.654
0

Abstract

To investigate whether vitamin E protects against hepatic fibrosis in mice with Schistosoma japonicum infection, 24 pathogen-free Kunming mice were selected and randomly divided into four groups: control (uninfected, untreated), model (infected, untreated), low-dose intervention (infected, vitamin E-treated, 30 mg/g bodyweight/day) and high-dose intervention (infected, vitamin E-treated, 60 mg/g bodyweight/day). Mice were infected with Schistosoma japonicum by inoculating abdominal skin with snail hosts. The activities of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT) were detected in hepatic tissue by colorimetry. The expression levels of laminin (LN), hyaluronic acid (HA), procollagen type Ⅲ (PC-III) and type Ⅳ collagen (IV-C) were detected in the serum by radioimmunoassay. Finally, areas and numbers of granulomas were assessed through histopathology 42 days following treatment. The results revealed that mean areas of granulomas were smaller in the low- and high-dose intervention groups compared to those in the model group. Furthermore, the higher dose of vitamin E resulted in smaller granulomas than the low dose. The levels of LN, HA, PC-III and IV-C in the serum were lower following vitamin E treatment than in the model group. By contrast, activity of SOD, GPx and CAT in hepatic tissue was higher following vitamin E treatment compared to the model group. The activity of MDA was lower in hepatic tissue following vitamin E treatment compared to the model group, but was higher compared to controls. In general, the higher dose of vitamin E affected measurements to a greater extent than the lower dose. In conclusion, vitamin E treatment may reduce the growth of granulomas, slowing the process of hepatic fibrosis, and this effect may be the result of the altered activity of the oxidation-reduction enzyme system.

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February 2012
Volume 5 Issue 2

Print ISSN: 1791-2997
Online ISSN:1791-3004

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APA
Wang, X., Zhang, R., Du, J., Hu, Y., Xu, L., Lu, J., & Ye, S. (2012). Vitamin E reduces hepatic fibrosis in mice with Schistosoma japonicum infection. Molecular Medicine Reports, 5, 465-468. http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2011.654
MLA
Wang, X., Zhang, R., Du, J., Hu, Y., Xu, L., Lu, J., Ye, S."Vitamin E reduces hepatic fibrosis in mice with Schistosoma japonicum infection". Molecular Medicine Reports 5.2 (2012): 465-468.
Chicago
Wang, X., Zhang, R., Du, J., Hu, Y., Xu, L., Lu, J., Ye, S."Vitamin E reduces hepatic fibrosis in mice with Schistosoma japonicum infection". Molecular Medicine Reports 5, no. 2 (2012): 465-468. http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2011.654