Abiraterone acetate withdrawal syndrome: Speculations on the underlying mechanisms

  • Authors:
    • Tomonori Kato
    • Akira Komiya
    • Joji Yuasa
    • Kanya Kaga
    • Mayuko Kaga
    • Satoko Kojima
    • Yukio Naya
    • Shigeo Isaka
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: December 14, 2017     https://doi.org/10.3892/ol.2017.7628
  • Pages:2669-2672
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Abstract

A 72-year-old man initially presented with lumbar and right chest pain, but was later found out to also have an elevated prostate‑specific antigen (PSA) level at 2,000.0 ng/ml. Further evaluation disclosed metastatic prostate cancer involving the bones and lymph nodes. The patient was initially treated with combined androgen blockade (CAB) with leuprolide acetate and bicalutamide. After 6 months of CAB, the patient's PSA level began to rise from the nadir (85.1 ng/ml) to 113.3 ng/ml. Bicalutamide was withdrawn in anticipation of anti‑androgen withdrawal syndrome and the PSA level declined temporally. However, it increased up to 517.0 ng/ml thereafter. Consequently, a year after CAB, abiraterone acetate (AA) was initiated at a standard dose of 1,000 mg daily in combination with 10 mg of prednisolone. PSA rapidly decreased to the nadir of 20.1 ng/ml thereafter. The PSA level remained stable until 2 years after AA administration. However, he decided to reduce the dose of AA to half of the standard dose (500 mg daily). Contrary to our expectations, the serum PSA level promptly decreased to a nadir of 8.1 ng/ml. Thereafter, the PSA level remained stable until 3 years and 9 months after AA administration. Subsequently, the patient stopped taking AA and prednisolone. However, to our surprise, the patient's serum PSA level decreased further to <1.0 ng/ml after AA discontinuation. His PSA remained <1.0 ng/ml without clinical or radiological progression for 1 year after AA withdrawal. Recently, it was reported that cessation of AA is associated with AA withdrawal syndrome in metastatic castration‑resistant prostate cancer, defined as a PSA decrease after AA discontinuation, mimicking anti‑androgen withdrawal syndrome. In the present study, explanations of the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon were explored, including mutant AR activation by alternative ligands.

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February 2018
Volume 15 Issue 2

Print ISSN: 1792-1074
Online ISSN:1792-1082

2016 Impact Factor: 1.39
Ranked #68/217 Oncology
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APA
Kato, T., Komiya, A., Yuasa, J., Kaga, K., Kaga, M., Kojima, S. ... Isaka, S. (2018). Abiraterone acetate withdrawal syndrome: Speculations on the underlying mechanisms. Oncology Letters, 15, 2669-2672. https://doi.org/10.3892/ol.2017.7628
MLA
Kato, T., Komiya, A., Yuasa, J., Kaga, K., Kaga, M., Kojima, S., Naya, Y., Isaka, S."Abiraterone acetate withdrawal syndrome: Speculations on the underlying mechanisms". Oncology Letters 15.2 (2018): 2669-2672.
Chicago
Kato, T., Komiya, A., Yuasa, J., Kaga, K., Kaga, M., Kojima, S., Naya, Y., Isaka, S."Abiraterone acetate withdrawal syndrome: Speculations on the underlying mechanisms". Oncology Letters 15, no. 2 (2018): 2669-2672. https://doi.org/10.3892/ol.2017.7628