Oncology Letters Special Issues

Extracellular vesicles in three-dimensional cancer models

Lead Editor:

    Dr ILARIA GIUSTI
    University of L'Aquila
    Italy

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are lipid-bilayer enclosed vesicles released from almost all cells as means of cell-to-cell communication, in both physiological and pathological processes. The role of EVs has been widely studied in cancer diseases, mostly using the classical monolayer culture models. It is well documented, instead, that 2D (monolayer) or 3D (including spheroids, organoids, or scaffolds) culture conditions differ in terms of cell-cell interaction, morphology, proliferation, and signal transduction; although the 2D model is still the most widely used in vitro, 3D culture appears to be more suitable for mimicking tissue architecture and cell behavior in vivo. Only few information on EVs biology have been obtained from 3D models; however, being the plasma membrane widely involved in the release of EVs, it is possible that the type of cell-cell interaction in a 2D or 3D model could deeply affect their characteristics in terms of number, size, and molecular cargo. The special issue could collect studies conducted on three-dimensional culture models, included in the following, not exhaustive, list: - Tissues - Spheroids - Organoids - Neurospheres - Mammospheres - Scaffolds - Organ-on-chip


Submission deadline: 07 August 2022

COVID-19 infection and cancer - multiple impact areas

Lead Editor:

    Dr Constantin Caruntu
    "Carol Davila" University of Medicine and Pharmacy
    Romania

The COVID-19 pandemic is considered a global health threat of unprecedented magnitude in our times. Through infectious mechanisms, massive inflammation, impaired coagulation pathways, destructive processes with abnormal regeneration that take place at systemic level, it induces an increased risk in patients with chronic diseases. Cancer patients in particular have a higher risk of morbidity and mortality associated with COVID-19 infection. On the one hand, the underlying malignancy causes a weakening of these patients, and the associated treatment can have a major impact on the functioning of the immune response. On the other hand, the important inflammatory phenomena, the impaired defense system and other cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the infection could contribute to the increased risk of cancer development and progression. Moreover, the COVID-19 pandemic affects the health care systems, generating a major overload. This delays the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of cancer patients. It also affects the proper development of cancer screening and prevention programs. Understanding the impact on health systems allows them to adapt quickly to the challenges associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, by reorganizing and modifying work strategies, redesigning diagnosis, therapeutic and follow-up protocols, implementing modern techniques such as telemedicine, digital health and artificial intelligence technology. Also, the COVID-19 pandemic could alter the paradigms of cancer research and could have a long-term impact in cancer care. This Special Issue aims to bring together articles on these various possible areas of impact between COVID-19 infection and cancer.


Submission deadline: 21 July 2022

Non-coding RNA at the Frontier of Early Diagnosis, Prognosis Evaluation, and Cancer Treatments

Lead Editor:

    Dr Ying Liu
    Institute for Translational Medicine, Qingdao University
    China

Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), such as lncRNAs, circRNAs, miRNAs, are involved in practically all aspects of cancer progression. These ncRNAs show significant differential expression pattern in both biofluids and tissue samples of patients. The biofluids can be easily and reproducibly collected for analyses. The rapid advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies and bioinformatics have further helped the development of ncRNA-based therapeutic strategy and diagnostic tests used by clinicians. This special issue focuses on the clinical aspects of ncRNAs, in particular validation of novel biomarkers that may serve as signature for non-invasive early detection of cancerous cells, predict patients' prognosis and response to specific therapies.


Submission deadline: 07 July 2022

Clinical and Molecular Insights on Urothelial Carcinoma

Lead Editor:

    Dr Chien-feng Li
    Chi-Mei Medical Center
    Taiwan

Urothelial carcinomas (UCs) are one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide, they arise from the upper urinary tracts and lower urinary tracts. Urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma (UBUC) is the most prevalent among the UCs (90%-95%). Upper tract urothelial carcinomas (UTUCs) are relatively rare compared with UBUCs and only account for 5-10% of UCs in Western countries but demonstrate an unusual high prevalence in some regions. At molecular level, UCs are driven by two different genetic pathways that form noninvasive low-grade papillary carcinoma and high-grade non-invasive/invasive carcinomasm respectively. The mutation of FGFR3, HRAS and PIK3CA involved in the MAPK and PI3K pathways are associated with the growth of non-invasive low-grade papillary urothelial carcinomas. While Deficiency of TP53 and retinoblastoma 1 (RB) related to cell cycle regulation at the G1/S checkpoint usually occurs in high-grade in situ and invasive carcinomas. Although some genetic hallmarks have been disclosed for urothelial carcinogenesis, the underlying mechanism responsible for urothelial carcinoma initiation and progression remains largely unknown. Moreover, there are relatively limited therapeutics for UCs. In spite of the development of immunotherapy and fibroblast growth factor receptors-2 and -3 targeted therapy, surgery remains to be the mainstay of early-stage UCs; chemotherapy and experimental therapies remain the therapeutic cornerstone in unresectable and metastatic UCs. Accordingly, it is mandatory to collect more molecular, translational, and clinical insights on UCs for further theranostic adjuncts.


Submission deadline: 06 July 2022

Management of prostate cancer in 2022

Lead Editor:

    Dr Carole Hélissey
    Military Hospital Begin
    France

From emerging new hormonotherapy, PARP inhibitors, to metabolic therapy. The development of these treatments initially in monotherapy and later in combination therapy has clearly improved the survival of patients at first in the metastatic stage and today in the localized stage. However, which treatment for each patient? When to introduce it? How to monitor the effectiveness, beyond the PSA, which imaging? Theranostic should now be developed for patients with prostate cancer. More than 85% of patients will be alive 5 years after their diagnosis, all stages combined, so the quality of life of these patients is important. In this Special Issue, we invite research that highlights further advances in prostate cancer diagnostic, therapies, patient care.


Submission deadline: 29 June 2022

Update on gynecologic surgery in benign and oncologic disease

Lead Editor:

    Professor Stefano Cianci
    University of Messina
    Italy

Gynecologic surgery is in continuous development. New technologies and new techniques are actually available from endoscopy to robotic both in oncology and benign pathology. The applications are different allowing to obtain better surgical dexterity, imaging and invasiveness reduction. This focused issue is aimed to give an overview and an update on novelties in gynecologic surgery


Submission deadline: 29 June 2022

Molecular target and action mechanism of anti-cancer agents

Lead Editor:

    Professor Seok-Geun Lee
    Kyung Hee University
    Republic of Korea

Recent advances in genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics are changing the way physicians and scientists approach the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Increased knowledge of cancer diagnosis with more detailed stratification based on patient omics data helps to move the field of precision oncology forward. In addition, developing new anti-cancer drugs targeting genetic changes is another important part of precision oncology. In this context, this Special Issue aims to cover molecular-mechanism-based research for anticancer therapy. It welcomes original research, and review articles on the discovery of molecular targets or/and molecular mechanisms of any anti-cancer agents, including conventional chemotherapy, novel potential anti-cancer drug candidates, and their combinations with any other anti-cancer modalities.


Submission deadline: 28 June 2022

The management of brain metastasis: recent treatment and future directions

Lead Editor:

    Dr Atsuto Katano
    University of Tokyo Hospital
    Japan

Brain metastasis causes neurological symptoms depending on the localization of the lesion and the degree of surrounding edema and might be a detriment to the quality of life of the patients. Even if the patient is asymptomatic, neurological symptoms may appear in a short period of time. Although brain metastasis occurs of patients with advanced-stage cancer, the prognosis of cancer patients has been improved in recent years due to advances in systemic therapy, especially molecular targeted agents and immune checkpoint inhibitors. On the other hand, the frequency of asymptomatic brain metastasis is gradually increasing due to the development of diagnostic imaging such as magnetic resonance imaging, and the management of brain metastasis has become one of the most important issues in cancer treatment in order to proceed with treatment without decreasing the quality of life of patients as much as possible. This review focused on the appropriate management of brain metastasis in cancer treatment.


Submission deadline: 22 June 2022

Role of Wnt signaling pathway in lung cancer

Lead Editor:

    Dr Noriaki Sunaga
    Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine
    Japan

The Wnt signaling pathway is classified into β-catenin-dependent (canonical) and -independent (non-canonical) pathways, both of which play pivotal roles in embryonic development and the regulation of many cellular functions. A close link between cancer and the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway has long been studied and growing evidence indicates that constitutive activation of the Wnt signaling by altered component of its pathway implicates in tumor growth, metastasis, angiogenesis, chromosome instability, cancer stemness, epithelial to mesenchymal transformation and immunomodulation of tumor microenvironment. Moreover, the Wnt pathway affects acquisition of resistance to molecular targeted drugs and immune checkpoint inhibitors. This special issue focuses on the role of Wnt signaling pathway in the tumorigenesis and therapeutic resistance in lung cancer.


Submission deadline: 22 June 2022

Natural Products: Recent Therapeutic Advances in Oncology Research

Lead Editor:

    Professor Mourad A. M. Aboul-Soud
    Chair of Medical and Molecular Genetics Research, Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, P.O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11433
    Saudi Arabia

Despite significant progress made towards discovery of potent chemotherapeutic agents, cancer remains an aggressive and devastating disease, being the second-leading cause of mortalities worldwide. Currently, therapeutic protocols employed to treat cancers primarily rely on three traditional strategies including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The intrinsic non-target toxicity to normal cells of the repertoire of chemotherapeutic anticancer drugs utilized in clinical settings is considered a limitation. Alternatively, natural products (NPs) have been shown to be effective as anticancer drugs with a wider safety margin and minimal side effects. The primary focus of this special issue is therefore to invite submissions of original articles and reviews tackling the discovery of NPs isolated from various terrestrial and marine sources with potential anticancer activities and the elucidation of their mechanism-of-action. Studies employing in vitro cancer cell lines and in vivo non-human primate models are welcome provided that they are appropriately-designed to include non-cancerous and positive controls. Research on natural extracts/fractions must incorporate full chemical characterization of their constituents. Articles dealing with the cytotoxicity of green-synthesized nanoparticles such as metal, metal oxide and polymeric nanocomposites are also welcome contingent on including mechanistic insights. Work on naturally-derived synthetic analogues or congeners with enhanced efficacy is also considered.


Submission deadline: 22 June 2022

Journal Cover

June-2022
Volume 23 Issue 6

Print ISSN: 1792-1074
Online ISSN: 1792-1082

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