Open Access

miR‑888 functions as an oncogene and predicts poor prognosis in colorectal cancer

  • Authors:
    • Su‑Jun Gao
    • Lei Chen
    • Wei Lu
    • Li Zhang
    • Lu Wang
    • Hai‑Hang Zhu
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: April 11, 2018     https://doi.org/10.3892/ol.2018.8461
  • Pages: 9101-9109
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Abstract

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of tumor formation, progression and metastasis. The present study characterized a novel miRNA (miR)‑888, as a potent oncomiR in human colorectal cancer (CRC). The clinicopathological investigation on 126 cases of CRC patients demonstrated that the expression level of miR‑888 was significantly upregulated in tumors compared with adjacent healthy tissue, and was associated with tumor stage and histological differentiation. A Kaplan‑Meier analysis and log‑rank test demonstrated that CRC patients with increased miR‑888 expression exhibited a decreased overall survival (OS) and disease‑free survival (DFS) compared with patients with low miR‑888 expression. Further univariate and multivariate analyses identified miR‑888 as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival outcome in CRC patients. To determine the biological role of miR‑888 in human CRC, in vitro Cell Counting kit‑8, wound healing and transwell assays were performed and demonstrated that miR‑888 contributed greatly to CRC cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Furthermore, potential targets of miR‑888 were investigated using a luciferase reporter assay, followed by polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The findings revealed that miR‑888 directly bound to the 3'‑untranslated region of mothers against decapentaplegic‑4 and thus inhibited its expression and promoted the tumor growth factor‑1‑induced cancer metastasis signaling. The results of the present study identified miR‑888 as an oncogenic miRNA in CRC and provide a foundation for promising research in the future regarding this predictive and prognostic biomarker.

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June 2018
Volume 15 Issue 6

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Copy and paste a formatted citation
APA
Gao, S., Chen, L., Lu, W., Zhang, L., Wang, L., & Zhu, H. (2018). miR‑888 functions as an oncogene and predicts poor prognosis in colorectal cancer. Oncology Letters, 15, 9101-9109. https://doi.org/10.3892/ol.2018.8461
MLA
Gao, S., Chen, L., Lu, W., Zhang, L., Wang, L., Zhu, H."miR‑888 functions as an oncogene and predicts poor prognosis in colorectal cancer". Oncology Letters 15.6 (2018): 9101-9109.
Chicago
Gao, S., Chen, L., Lu, W., Zhang, L., Wang, L., Zhu, H."miR‑888 functions as an oncogene and predicts poor prognosis in colorectal cancer". Oncology Letters 15, no. 6 (2018): 9101-9109. https://doi.org/10.3892/ol.2018.8461