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Analysis of perinatal risk factors for small‑for‑gestational‑age and appropriate‑for‑gestational‑age late‑term infants

  • Authors:
    • Jing Cheng
    • Junqi Li
    • Xiqin Tang
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: January 3, 2020     https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2020.8417
  • Pages: 1719-1724
  • Copyright: © Cheng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License.

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Abstract

To investigate the potential risk factors for small‑for‑gestational‑age (SGA) and appropriate‑for‑gestational‑age (AGA) late‑term infants, 100 cases of single full‑term SGA infants delivered in the Department of Obstetrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University in 2017 were enrolled as the SGA group. A total of 100 healthy AGA who were born at the same time with the same gestational age were randomly included as the control group. The perinatal and postpartum adverse conditions of the two groups were recorded, and Apgar tests were performed on all newborns at 1 min (T1), 5 min (T2) and 10 min (T3) after birth. A follow‑up survey was conducted in all patients at 6 and 12 months of age. At the second follow‑up, the development quotient of the children was measured using the Gesell Developmental Schedule, and the perinatal risk factors of SGA were analyzed. The incidence of intrauterine distress, respiratory distress syndrome and infectious disease in the SGA group was significantly higher compared with that in the AGA group (P<0.05). The Apgar scores at T1, T2 and T3 were significantly lower in the SGA group compared with the AGA group (P<0.05). The Apgar score at T1 was lower compared with that at T2 in the SGA group (P<0.05), and the Apgar score at T2 was lower compared with that at T3 (P<0.05). The length of hospital stay in the SGA group was significantly longer compared with that in the AGA group (P<0.05). The development quotient at the 6 and 12th month in the SGA group was significantly lower compared with that in the AGA group (P<0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed that there was no correlation between SGA and maternal age, regardless of firstborn status, neonatal sex, mode of delivery and living environment. SGA was significantly associated with umbilical cord abnormalities, maternal pregnancy‑induced hypertension, gestational diabetes, pregnancy infection and intrauterine distress (P<0.05). An abnormal umbilical cord, maternal pregnancy‑induced hypertension, gestational diabetes, infection during pregnancy and intrauterine distress are all perinatal risk factors for SGA. Effective interventions are needed in clinical assessment to prevent the occurrence of SGA.
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March 2020
Volume 19 Issue 3

Print ISSN: 1792-0981
Online ISSN:1792-1015

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APA
Cheng, J., Li, J., & Tang, X. (2020). Analysis of perinatal risk factors for small‑for‑gestational‑age and appropriate‑for‑gestational‑age late‑term infants. Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine, 19, 1719-1724. https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2020.8417
MLA
Cheng, J., Li, J., Tang, X."Analysis of perinatal risk factors for small‑for‑gestational‑age and appropriate‑for‑gestational‑age late‑term infants". Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine 19.3 (2020): 1719-1724.
Chicago
Cheng, J., Li, J., Tang, X."Analysis of perinatal risk factors for small‑for‑gestational‑age and appropriate‑for‑gestational‑age late‑term infants". Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine 19, no. 3 (2020): 1719-1724. https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2020.8417