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World Health Organization, radiofrequency radiation and health - a hard nut to crack (Review)

  • Authors:
    • Lennart Hardell
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: June 21, 2017     https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.2017.4046
  • Pages: 405-413
  • Copyright: © Hardell et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License.

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Abstract

In May 2011 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) evaluated cancer risks from radiofrequency (RF) radiation. Human epidemiological studies gave evidence of increased risk for glioma and acoustic neuroma. RF radiation was classified as Group 2B, a possible human carcinogen. Further epidemiological, animal and mechanistic studies have strengthened the association. In spite of this, in most countries little or nothing has been done to reduce exposure and educate people on health hazards from RF radiation. On the contrary ambient levels have increased. In 2014 the WHO launched a draft of a Monograph on RF fields and health for public comments. It turned out that five of the six members of the Core Group in charge of the draft are affiliated with International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), an industry loyal NGO, and thus have a serious conflict of interest. Just as by ICNIRP, evaluation of non-thermal biological effects from RF radiation are dismissed as scientific evidence of adverse health effects in the Monograph. This has provoked many comments sent to the WHO. However, at a meeting on March 3, 2017 at the WHO Geneva office it was stated that the WHO has no intention to change the Core Group.

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APA
Hardell, L. (2017). World Health Organization, radiofrequency radiation and health - a hard nut to crack (Review). International Journal of Oncology, 51, 405-413. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.2017.4046
MLA
Hardell, L."World Health Organization, radiofrequency radiation and health - a hard nut to crack (Review)". International Journal of Oncology 51.2 (2017): 405-413.
Chicago
Hardell, L."World Health Organization, radiofrequency radiation and health - a hard nut to crack (Review)". International Journal of Oncology 51, no. 2 (2017): 405-413. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.2017.4046