Open Access

Effect of simulated microgravity on metabolism of HGC‑27 gastric cancer cells

  • Authors:
    • Zheng‑Yang Chen
    • Nan Jiang
    • Song Guo
    • Bin‑Bin Li
    • Jia‑Qi Yang
    • Shao‑Bin Chai
    • Hong‑Feng Yan
    • Pei‑Ming Sun
    • Tao Zhang
    • Hong‑Wei Sun
    • He‑Ming Yang
    • Jin‑Lian Zhou
    • Yan Cui
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: March 10, 2020     https://doi.org/10.3892/ol.2020.11451
  • Pages: 3439-3450
  • Copyright: © Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License.

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Abstract

The understanding into the pathogenesis and treatment of gastric cancer has improved in recent years; however, a number of limitations have delayed the development of effective treatment. Cancer cells can undergo glycolysis and inhibit oxidative phosphorylation in the presence of oxygen (Warburg effect). Previous studies have demonstrated that a rotary cell culture system (RCCS) can induce glycolytic metabolism. In addition, the potential of regulating cancer cells by targeting their metabolites has led to the rapid development of metabolomics. In the present study, human HGC‑27 gastric cancer cells were cultured in a RCCS bioreactor, simulating weightlessness. Subsequently, liquid chromatography‑mass spectrometry was used to examine the effects of simulated microgravity (SMG) on the metabolism of HGC‑27 cells. A total of 67 differentially regulated metabolites were identified, including upregulated and downregulated metabolites. Compared with the normal gravity group, phosphatidyl ethanolamine, phosphatidyl choline, arachidonic acid and sphinganine were significantly upregulated in SMG conditions, whereas sphingomyelin, phosphatidyl serine, phosphatidic acid, L‑proline, creatine, pantothenic acid, oxidized glutathione, adenosine diphosphate and adenosine triphosphate were significantly downregulated. The Human Metabolome Database compound analysis revealed that lipids and lipid‑like metabolites were primarily affected in an SMG environment in the present study. Overall, the findings of the present study may aid our understanding of gastric cancer by identifying the underlying mechanisms of metabolism of the disease under SMG.

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May 2020
Volume 19 Issue 5

Print ISSN: 1792-1074
Online ISSN:1792-1082

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APA
Chen, Z., Jiang, N., Guo, S., Li, B., Yang, J., Chai, S. ... Cui, Y. (2020). Effect of simulated microgravity on metabolism of HGC‑27 gastric cancer cells. Oncology Letters, 19, 3439-3450. https://doi.org/10.3892/ol.2020.11451
MLA
Chen, Z., Jiang, N., Guo, S., Li, B., Yang, J., Chai, S., Yan, H., Sun, P., Zhang, T., Sun, H., Yang, H., Zhou, J., Cui, Y."Effect of simulated microgravity on metabolism of HGC‑27 gastric cancer cells". Oncology Letters 19.5 (2020): 3439-3450.
Chicago
Chen, Z., Jiang, N., Guo, S., Li, B., Yang, J., Chai, S., Yan, H., Sun, P., Zhang, T., Sun, H., Yang, H., Zhou, J., Cui, Y."Effect of simulated microgravity on metabolism of HGC‑27 gastric cancer cells". Oncology Letters 19, no. 5 (2020): 3439-3450. https://doi.org/10.3892/ol.2020.11451