The effect of NFATc1 on vascular generation and the possible underlying mechanism in epithelial ovarian carcinoma

  • Authors:
    • Long Li
    • Jihui Yu
    • Zhaoning Duan
    • Hong-Xing Dang
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: January 25, 2016     https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.2016.3355
  • Pages: 1457-1466
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Abstract

We investigated the effect of nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) on the growth and vascular generation of human ovarian carcinoma SKOV3 cell-transplanted tumors in nude mice and explored the possible underlying mechanism. NFATc1 siRNA was transfected into the SKOV3 cells, which were then subjected to immunofluorescence tests and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to determine the transfection-induced inhibition rate. The tumor volumes in the nude mice in all groups were measured to determine the in vivo antitumor effect of NFATc1 siRNA. Immunohistochemical (IHC) methods were employed to detect NFATc1 expression in tumor tissue, combined with cytokeratin (CK) staining to label the epithelial origin of the tumor tissue. CD34 and podoplanin were used as markers for labeling microvessels and microlymphatic vessels, respectively. The densities of microvessels and microlymphatic vessels in each group were calculated and statistically analyzed. RT-PCR and western blotting were performed to detect the protein and mRNA expression levels of NFATc1, the ELR+ CXC chemokine interleukin (IL)-8, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF BB) in xenografted tumor tissue in all groups. NFATc1 was highly expressed in tumor tissue in the control groups. The intervention group exhibited a tumor growth inhibition rate of 57.08% and presented a lower tumor weight and volume compared with the two control groups. In the control groups, the microvessel densities were 12.00±1.65 and 11.47±0.32, respectively, and the microlymphatic vessel densities were 10.03±0.96 and 9.95±1.12; these values were significantly higher than in the intervention group. RT-PCR and western blot shows that NFATc1 siRNA could markedly suppress the expression of IL-8, FGF-2 and PDGF BB at the mRNA and the protein level. In conclusion, it was shown that NFATc1 siRNA significantly suppresses the growth and vascular generation of SKOV3 human ovarian carcinoma cell-transplanted tumors subcutaneously xenografted into nude mice. The downregulation of the expression of IL-8, FGF-2 and PDGF BB may be one of the mechanisms underlying the above inhibitory effects.

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April 2016
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APA
Li, L., Yu, J., Duan, Z., & Dang, H. (2016). The effect of NFATc1 on vascular generation and the possible underlying mechanism in epithelial ovarian carcinoma. International Journal of Oncology, 48, 1457-1466. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.2016.3355
MLA
Li, L., Yu, J., Duan, Z., Dang, H."The effect of NFATc1 on vascular generation and the possible underlying mechanism in epithelial ovarian carcinoma". International Journal of Oncology 48.4 (2016): 1457-1466.
Chicago
Li, L., Yu, J., Duan, Z., Dang, H."The effect of NFATc1 on vascular generation and the possible underlying mechanism in epithelial ovarian carcinoma". International Journal of Oncology 48, no. 4 (2016): 1457-1466. https://doi.org/10.3892/ijo.2016.3355