Open Access

Rhizoma Paridis saponins ameliorates hepatic fibrosis in rats by downregulating expression of angiogenesis‑associated growth factors

  • Authors:
    • Yanquan Han
    • Lingyu Pan
    • Shan Ran
    • Yan Song
    • Fang‑Fang Sun
    • Yong‑Zhong Wang
    • Yan Hong
  • View Affiliations

  • Published online on: March 5, 2019     https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2019.10006
  • Pages: 3548-3554
  • Copyright: © Han et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License.

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Abstract

Previously, we demonstrated that Rhizoma Paridis saponins (RPS), the major active component of Rhizoma Paridis, may exhibit hepatoprotective effects. The present study aimed to identify the potential mechanism of RPS on hepatic injury and improvement in hepatic fibrosis (HF). A HF model was created in Sprague‑Dawley rats by administration of carbon tetrachloride. RPS was administered for treatment following creation of the HF model. The protein and mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet‑derived growth factor (PDGF), extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and α‑smooth muscle actin (SMA) was detected by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. RPS was demonstrated to improve hepatic inflammation and decrease HF severity according to hematoxylin and eosin and Masson trichrome staining. Following RPS treatment, the level of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and malondialdehyde, and expression levels of the mRNA and protein of VEGF, ERK1/2, PDGF and α‑SMA in the model group was decreased. By contrast, the content of glutathione‑PX and superoxide dismutase was increased. These data suggest that RPS may treat HF primarily through downregulation of the expression levels of the mRNA and phosphorylated VEGF, ERK1/2, PDGF and α‑SMA proteins.

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May 2019
Volume 19 Issue 5

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Copy and paste a formatted citation
APA
Han, Y., Pan, L., Ran, S., Song, Y., Sun, F., Wang, Y., & Hong, Y. (2019). Rhizoma Paridis saponins ameliorates hepatic fibrosis in rats by downregulating expression of angiogenesis‑associated growth factors. Molecular Medicine Reports, 19, 3548-3554. https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2019.10006
MLA
Han, Y., Pan, L., Ran, S., Song, Y., Sun, F., Wang, Y., Hong, Y."Rhizoma Paridis saponins ameliorates hepatic fibrosis in rats by downregulating expression of angiogenesis‑associated growth factors". Molecular Medicine Reports 19.5 (2019): 3548-3554.
Chicago
Han, Y., Pan, L., Ran, S., Song, Y., Sun, F., Wang, Y., Hong, Y."Rhizoma Paridis saponins ameliorates hepatic fibrosis in rats by downregulating expression of angiogenesis‑associated growth factors". Molecular Medicine Reports 19, no. 5 (2019): 3548-3554. https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2019.10006